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Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons
     Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons
Official journal of the Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons         
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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 368-371

Surgery in the neonatal intensive care unit in Indian scenario: Should it be “the new state of the art” or just “the need of the hour”?


1 Department of General Surgery, Pediatric Surgery Unit, Amaltas Institute of Medical Sciences, Dewas, Madhya Pradesh, India
2 Department of Pediatrics, Amaltas Institute of Medical Sciences, Dewas, Madhya Pradesh, India
3 Indore Newborn Care Centre, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh Garge
Department of General Surgery, Pediatric Surgery Unit, Amaltas Institute of Medical Sciences, Dewas, Madhya Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jiaps.JIAPS_165_19

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Introduction: Critically ill surgical neonates are physiologically challenged and delicately poised on ventilator and inotropic support systems. They experience significant stress in the event of surgery. Shifting them poise further addition to this stress. We here share our experience of operating such surgical neonates for certain conditions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data of operated patients in the NICU. We collected the demographic data, diagnosis, and preoperative stability of the patient, ventilator and inotropic requirements, need for extra anesthetic drugs, procedures performed, complications, and outcome. Operations were performed at bedside in the NICU in critically ill, unstable neonates who needed emergency surgery, neonates of very low birth weight (<1000 g), and neonates on special equipment such as high-frequency ventilators. We excluded minor routine procedures such as drain placement, central line placement, ventricular taps, incision and drainage, and intercostal drainage procedures. Results: We performed seven surgical procedures in the NICU. These included bowel resections and stoma creation, fistula ligation, lung biopsies, and ventricular reservoir placement. Gestational age ranged between 24 and 34 weeks (mean, 28 weeks). Birth weights ranged between 800 and 2500 g (mean, 1357 g). Age at surgery was between 2 and 18 days (mean, 10.2 days). All our patients were on inotropic support and were intubated and mechanically ventilated. Conclusion: Doing surgery for critically ill neonates in the NICU definitely has a place. It was the need of the hour based on the condition of the neonates; however, we feel that neonatal surgery in the NICU should be the norm as it can improve survival. Surgery in the NICU can give a fighting chance to these patients; however, operation theaters in the NICU would be an ideal setting.






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  2005 - Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow 

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