Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons
Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons
                                                   Official journal of the Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons                           
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 136--139

Anorectal malformations in children


Pranshu Bhargava, JK Mahajan, Ajay Kumar 
 Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital and Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Pranshu Bhargava
Dept. of Neurosurgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh
India

Background/Purpose: Anorectal malformations are one of the most common congenital defects. This study was undertaken to study the hospital incidence of anorectal malformations (ARM), frequency of various types of defects, their sex distribution and the spectrum of anomalies associated with ARM. The effect of presence of an associated defect on mortality and morbidity was also studied. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive children attending the pediatric surgery department were included in this study. A detailed history was taken, and examination was performed for the primary as well as the associated defects. Appropriate investigations like invertogram, cologram were done wherever indicated. Management was as per the standard protocol. The data was recorded and analyzed. Results: Out of the 100 patients, 51 were males and 49 females. One out of every 6.62 admission was for ARM. Twenty percent of the female babies had high, 76% intermediate and 4% had low anomalies, whereas 80.39% males had high, 3.92% intermediate and 15.6% showed low malformations. Ten percent of the patients had pouch colon. Associated anomalies were seen in 33 patients - 20 males and 13 females; 19 in high, 10 in intermediate, 1 in low group and 3 children with cloacal malformations. Associated defects seen were urogenital (17%), cardiovascular (7%), gastrointestinal (9%), genital (5%) and limb defects (7%). There were 8 deaths, and complications were seen in 13 patients. Ten patients had two or more defects associated with ARM. Conclusions: Anorectal malformations occurred equally in males and females. Females had intermediate defects more frequently, rectovestibular fistula being the commonest. Males were more likely to have high lesions; anorectal agenesis without fistula was the commonest defect. The most common associated defects seen were vesicoureteric reflux and esophageal atresia. Complications were seen more commonly in males with high lesions. There was a significant association between presence of an associated defect and mortality and morbidity.


How to cite this article:
Bhargava P, Mahajan J K, Kumar A. Anorectal malformations in children.J Indian Assoc Pediatr Surg 2006;11:136-139


How to cite this URL:
Bhargava P, Mahajan J K, Kumar A. Anorectal malformations in children. J Indian Assoc Pediatr Surg [serial online] 2006 [cited 2019 Jun 16 ];11:136-139
Available from: http://www.jiaps.com/article.asp?issn=0971-9261;year=2006;volume=11;issue=3;spage=136;epage=139;aulast=Bhargava;type=0