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Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons
     Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons
Official journal of the Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons         
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LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 205
 

Choledochal cyst with an aberrant right cholecysto-hepatic duct draining into cystic duct and a review of literature


1 Department of Pediatric Surgery, Lilavati Hospital and Research Centre, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Consultant Pediatric Surgeon, Lilavati Hospital and Research Centre; Wadia Children's Hospital, Honorary Consultant Pediatric Surgeon; Shushrusha Hospital, Consultant Pediatric Surgeon, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Date of Web Publication19-Jul-2016

Correspondence Address:
Rajeev G Redkar
Consultant Pediatric Surgeon, Lilavati Hospital and Research Centre; Wadia Children's Hospital, Honorary Consultant Pediatric Surgeon; Shushrusha Hospital, Consultant Pediatric Surgeon, Mumbai, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9261.158101

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How to cite this article:
Hathiramani V, Krishnan J, Raj V, Redkar RG. Choledochal cyst with an aberrant right cholecysto-hepatic duct draining into cystic duct and a review of literature. J Indian Assoc Pediatr Surg 2016;21:205

How to cite this URL:
Hathiramani V, Krishnan J, Raj V, Redkar RG. Choledochal cyst with an aberrant right cholecysto-hepatic duct draining into cystic duct and a review of literature. J Indian Assoc Pediatr Surg [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Sep 20];21:205. Available from: http://www.jiaps.com/text.asp?2016/21/4/205/158101


Sir,

A thorough knowledge of variations in the anatomy of gallbladder, bile ducts, the arteries that supply them and the liver are important to a surgeon. Failure to recognize these variations may lead to inadvertent ductal ligation, biliary leaks and strictures after biliary tract surgery. [1] Aberrant bile duct is thought to be the result of normal variation in the development of the biliary system, and its incidence is as low as 5% in the normal population. [2]

A 9-year-old female child presented with complaints of right upper quadrant pain associated with intermittent low grade fever, nonbilious vomiting and jaundice was diagnosed with a type four choledochal cyst with an accessory duct opening into the cystic duct. The child underwent a choledochal cyst excision with choledocho-jejunostomy with a roux-en-y jejuno-jejunostomy. The accessory duct was visualized after laying open the cystic duct and was incorporated in the choledocho-enterostomy. The child had an uneventful postoperative recovery.

An aberrant bile duct is the only bile duct draining a particular hepatic segment and drains directly into the extra-hepatic biliary tree, whereas an accessory one is an additional bile duct draining the same area of the liver. [3]

It is more commonly seen on the right side with the incidence of 4.6-8.4%. It frequently drains into common hepatic duct, common bile duct or even left hepatic duct. The anomalous drainage of an aberrant right hepatic duct into cystic duct is relatively rare.

Recently, a few authors have noticed a high degree of association between biliary anomalies and choledochal cysts. [4] Oversight of the existence of an aberrant bile duct during the operation might lead to severe biliary leakage, biliary peritonitis, biliary fistula or abscess formation. Arbitrary ligation of an aberrant bile duct that independently drained a liver segment will obstruct the corresponding intrahepatic bile duct and result in segmental cirrhosis. [1],[2],[3],[4] The knowledge of aberrant anatomy of biliary tract would be important for a surgeon to avoid any inadvertent complications during any biliary surgery.

With surgical advancement into laparoscopic and minimally invasive techniques, the basic principle of sound anatomic knowledge and relationships between the biliary tracts, hepatic and portal vessels is not outdated. Bile duct injury is one of the most serious complications during laparoscopic hepato-biliary surgeries and this rate is amplified when there are associated variations in the anatomy of the biliary tract.

 
   References Top

1.
Khamiso AH, Abdul AL, Sikandar AY, Arshad MM, Aamir IM, Sangrasi AK. Anatomical variations and congenital anomalies of Extra Hepatic Biliary System encountered during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. J Pak Med Assoc 2010;60:89-93.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Dong Q, Jiang B, Zhang H, Jiang Z, Lu H, Yang C, et al. Management strategy for congenital choledochal cyst with co-existing intrahepatic dilation and aberrant bile duct as well as other complicated biliary anomalies. Yonsei Med J 2006;47:826-32  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Mariolis-Sapsakos T, Kalles V, Papatheodorou K, Goutas N, Papapanagiotou I, Flessas I, et al. Anatomic variations of the right hepatic duct: Results and surgical implications from a cadaveric study. Anat Res Int 2012;2012:838179.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Sarin YK. Biliary ductal and vascular anomalies associated with choledochal cyst. J Indian Assoc Paediatr Surg 2005;10:86-8.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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