Home | About Us | Current Issue | Ahead of print | Archives | Search | Instructions | Subscription | Feedback | Editorial Board | e-Alerts | Login 
Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons
     Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons
Official journal of the Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons         
 Users Online:439 
  Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size


 
HOW I DO IT
Year : 2005  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 97-99
 

Laparoscopic repair of a Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia in a child, using a trans-sternal technique


1 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Amardeep Multispeciality Childrens Hospital and Research Center, Ahmedabad, India
2 Birmingham Children's Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Amar Shah
Amardeep Multispeciality Children's Hospital and Research Center, 65, Pritamnagar Society, Gujarat College Road, Ellisbridge, Ahmedabad - 380 006
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9261.16471

Rights and Permissions

 

   Abstract 

Laparoscopic repair of Morgagni hernia has been described in adults and children. In the published reports, the crux of the repair consists of suturing the posterior part of the diaphragmatic defect to the undersurface of the sternum or the posterior rectus sheath. The tissue on the undersurface of the sternum is variable is in its nature and may be inadequate for suturing, hence compromising the strength of the repair. A technique that circumvents this problem and offers a strong anatomical repair is described. A Morgagni hernia was diagnosed in a 2-year-old girl with trisomy 21, who presented with recurrent chest infections. She underwent laparoscopic repair of the hernia using three ports. The tissue on the undersurface of the sternum was inadequate for a conventional repair. The procedure was modified as follows: a small transverse incision was made over the lower end of the sternum. Three nonabsorbable mattress sutures were inserted through the sternum, the anterior edge of the diaphragmatic defect, and back through the sternum and tied with extracorporeal knots. The child was discharged home on the second postoperative day. At 6-month follow up, the child was asymptomatic, and had been infection free. A chest radiograph was normal. This is a simple, novel, noninvasive method, which offers a secure anatomical repair and it is not dependent on the adequacy of the tissue on the undersurface of the sternum.


Keywords: Child, laparoscopy, Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia


How to cite this article:
Shah A, Jawaheer G. Laparoscopic repair of a Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia in a child, using a trans-sternal technique. J Indian Assoc Pediatr Surg 2005;10:97-9

How to cite this URL:
Shah A, Jawaheer G. Laparoscopic repair of a Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia in a child, using a trans-sternal technique. J Indian Assoc Pediatr Surg [serial online] 2005 [cited 2018 Jan 22];10:97-9. Available from: http://www.jiaps.com/text.asp?2005/10/2/97/16471


Morgagni hernia arise as a result of a congenital defect in the anterior part of the diaphragm. They are rare and account for 1-6% of all diaphragmatic herniae.[1],[2] Laparoscopic repair of Morgagni hernia was first described in 1994.[3] Anatomical repair of such a defect comprises suturing the posterior edge of the diaphragmatic defect to the retrosternal and retrocostal tissues. The amount of retrosternal/retrocostal muscle can be minimal in some instances, hence compromising the strength of the repair. A modification of the published laparoscopic techniques is described, which offers a strong anatomical repair irrespective of the adequacy of the retrosternal/retrocostal tissues.


   Case report Top


A 2-year-old girl with trisomy 21 was diagnosed with a diaphragmatic hernia following a chest radiograph [Figure - 1] performed for recurrent chest infections. An upper gastrointestinal contrast study [Figure - 2] revealed a Morgagni hernia.

The child underwent laparoscopic repair of the hernia. She was placed in a supine position and pneumoperitoneum (flow 1.0 l/min, pressure 10 mm Hg) was created through a 5-mm subumbilical port placed using Hasson's technique. The surgeon stood at the foot end and the assistant to the right of the surgeon. Two further 5-mm ports were placed in each flank below the level of the umbilicus. The child was placed in reverse Trendelenburg. An elliptical 8 “ 5-cm substernal diaphragmatic defect was seen, wider in its transverse diameter. The hernial contents, comprising a few loops of small bowel, the hepatic flexure and omentum, were reduced without difficulty. The peritoneum was excised all around the edges of the defect and the sac partially excised. There was no anterior rim of muscle and the retrosternal endothoracic fascia was deemed inadequate for suturing.

A small transverse skin incision was made over the lower end of the sternum. A 2-0 Ethibond suture was introduced percutaneously through the sternum into the abdominal cavity under direct vision. A mattress suture of the posterior rim of the diaphragmatic defect was then taken and the needle was passed through the sternum and out of the skin incision. Two further sutures were taken in a similar fashion. The sutures were tied extracorporeally at the end of the procedure and the knots were buried subcutaneously. Good apposition was obtained between the diaphragm and the sternum.

The child made an uneventful postoperative recovery. She was discharged home on the second postoperative day. At 6-month follow up, she was asymptomatic and had been free of infection. A chest radiograph showed no recurrence of the hernia.


   Discussion Top


Since Morgagni's first description of an anteromedial diaphragmatic hernia in 1761, herniae have traditionally been repaired using an open technique through an abdominal or thoracic approach. The advent of endoscopic surgery has enabled the closure of these defects laparoscopically, first described in 1994. It is argued that irrespective of the approach, the principles of repair should remain unaltered. Those principles are: (i) anatomical closure of the defect, (ii) secure repair, (iii) minimization of tissue trauma, and (iv) avoidance of prosthetic materials when possible.

The defect at the foramen of Morgagni arises as a result of failure of fusion of the septum transversum to the sternum. Anatomical closure of the defect should therefore approximate the posterior rim of the diaphragmatic defect to the lower end of the sternum. The anatomy of the defect is variable in that the anterior rim of the diaphragm may be present or absent. The method of closure should take into account the anatomy. The methods described in the literature include direct suture repair using interrupted or continuous sutures, which is suitable for small defects. In those instances where the anterior rim of the diaphragm is absent, a technique has been described where the diaphragm is sutured to the retrosternal/retrocostal endothoracic fascia. In children, this fascia is thin and may compromise the strength of the repair. A technique has been described where the diaphragm is sutured to the upper posterior rectus sheath and the whole thickness of the abdominal wall is included in the repair.[1] Although such a technique provides a secure repair, the closure of the defect is not anatomical. The repair described in this paper takes advantage of the fact that the sternum offers little resistance to the passage of a needle in a child. The repair incorporates the whole thickness of the anterior chest wall and hence provides a secure closure of the hernial defect. The posterior rim of the diaphragm is approximated to the sternum, hence providing an anatomical repair.

The insertion of prosthetic materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene and polypropylene has been described using sutures or staples. [4],[5],[6] Such devices have not been used in children. The technique described here provides a secure tension-free repair using native tissue and avoids the use of a prosthesis, which predisposes to adhesions and infection.

The hernial sac was only partially excised. There is controversy in the literature concerning the management of the hernial sac. Some authors recommend excision of the sac,[1],[7] whereas others leave the sac in situ[8],[9] without compromising the outcome. In the case described here, only the redundant sac was excised and the remainder of the sac was left in situ to avoid pleural or pericardial injury. This case confirms that the presence of the sac in the chest does not affect the outcome of the repair of a Morgagni hernia.

The laparoscopic approach has the advantage that tissue trauma is kept to a minimum compared with the traditional open approach. There have been only four reports of the laparoscopic repair of a Morgagni hernia in children. [10],[11],[12],[13] The techniques have included a direct suture technique where the diaphragm is sutured to the retrosternal tissues using a Keith needle[14] or inclusion of the whole of the upper abdominal wall in the repair with extracorporeal knots. The technique described here is the first of its kind to be reported. It offers a secure anatomical repair in the absence of an anterior rim of the diaphragm, makes use of minimally invasive techniques, avoids the use of prosthesis and takes advantage of unique properties of pediatric tissues such as a soft sternum in a young child.



 
   References Top

1.Azzie G, Maoate K, Beasley S, Retief W, Bensoussan A. A Simple technique of laparoscopic full-thickness anterior abdominal wall repair of retrosternal (Morgagni) hernias. J Pediatr Surg 2003;38:768-70.  Back to cited text no. 1  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]
2.Stolar CJH, Dillon PW. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia and reduction, in O'Neill JA, Rowe MI, Grossfeld JL, editors. Pediatric Surgery 5th Ed. St Louis, MO: Mosby; 1998. p. 832.  Back to cited text no. 2    
3.Rau HG, Schardey HM, Lange V. Laparoscopic repair of a Morgagni hernia. Surg Endosc 1994;8:1439-42.  Back to cited text no. 3  [PUBMED]  
4.Orita M, Okino M, Yamashita K, Morita N, Esato K. Laparoscopic repair of diaphragmatic hernia through the foramen of Morgagni. Surg Endosc 1997;11:668-70.  Back to cited text no. 4  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]
5.Ramachandran CS, Arora V. Laparoscopic transabdominal repair of hernia of Morgagni-Larrey. Surg Laparosc. Endosc Percut Techn 1999;9:358-61.  Back to cited text no. 5  [PUBMED]  
6.Del Castillo D, Sanchez J, Hernandez M, Sanchez A, Domenech J, Jara J. Morgagni's hernia resolved by laparoscopic surgery. J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Techn 1998;8:105-8.  Back to cited text no. 6  [PUBMED]  
7.Fernandez-Cebrian JM, Perez De Oteyza. Laparoscopic repair of hernia of foramen of Morgagni: A new case report. J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Techn 1996;6:61-4.  Back to cited text no. 7    
8.Contini S, Dalla VR, Bonati L, Zinicola R. Laparoscopic repair of a Morgagni hernia: Report of the case and review of the literature. J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Techn 1999;9:93-9.  Back to cited text no. 8    
9.Bortul M, Calligaris L, Gheller P. Laparoscopic repair of a Morgagni-Larrey hernia. J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Techn 1998;8:309-13.  Back to cited text no. 9    
10.Van der Zee DC, Bax NM. Laparoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in a 6 month old child. Surg Endosc 1995;9:101-3.  Back to cited text no. 10    
11.Rothenberg SS, Chang JH, Bealer JF. Experience with minimally invasive surgery in infants. Am J Surg 1998;176:654-8.  Back to cited text no. 11    
12.Becmeur F, Jamali RR, Moog R, Keller L, Christmann D, Donato L, et al . Thoracoscopic treatment for delayed presentation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in the infant. A report of three cases. Surg Endosc 2001;15:1163-6.  Back to cited text no. 12    
13.Lima M, Lauro V, Domini M, Libri M, Bertozzi M, Pigna A, et al . Laparoscopic surgery of diaphragmatic diseases in children: Our experience with five cases. Eur J Pediatric Surg 2001;11:377-81.  Back to cited text no. 13    
14.Van Der Zee DC, Bax NMA, Valla J-S. Laparoscopic repair of diaphragmatic conditions in infants and children, in Bax NMA, Georgeson GE, Najmaldin AS, editors. Endoscopic Surgery in Children. New York: Springer; 1999. p. 327-8.  Back to cited text no. 14    


Figures

[Figure - 1], [Figure - 2]


This article has been cited by
1 Laparoscopic repair of a giant hernia of Morgagni
Catani, M. and De Milito, R. and Romagnoli, F. and Romeo, V. and Modini, C.
Chirurgia. 2011; 24(1): 15-19
[Pubmed]
2 Morgagnięs hernia: Believing is seeing
McBride, C.A., Beasley, S.W.
ANZ Journal of Surgery. 2008; 78(9): 739-744
[Pubmed]
3 MORGAGNI’S HERNIA: BELIEVING IS SEEING
Craig A. McBride,Spencer W. Beasley
ANZ Journal of Surgery. 2008; 78(9): 739
[Pubmed] | [DOI]



 

Top
Print this article  Email this article
Previous article Next article

    

 
  Search
 
   Next article
   Previous article 
   Table of Contents
  
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
    Article in PDF (126 KB)
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  


    Abstract
    Case report
    Discussion
    References
    Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed6652    
    Printed184    
    Emailed4    
    PDF Downloaded180    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 3    

Recommend this journal


Contact us | Sitemap | Advertise | What's New | Copyright and Disclaimer 

 © 2005 - Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow 

Online since 1st May '05