Home | About Us | Current Issue | Ahead of print | Archives | Search | Instructions | Subscription | Feedback | Editorial Board | e-Alerts | Login 
Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons
     Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons
Official journal of the Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons         
 Users Online:1080 
  Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 
Year : 1998  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 126-129

Early preoperative MR imaging of anorectal atresia.


Department of Paediatrics & Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith and Queen Charlottle's & Chelsea Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
MR Battin
Department of Paediatrics & Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith and Queen Charlottle's & Chelsea Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

ABSTRACT: The management of anorectal atresia depends on the level of the lesion and the presence of fistulae or associated genitourinary and sacral anomalies. If the lesion is low and the infant is well then a primary anoplasty may be performed in the early neonatal period. However, for high or intermediate lesions an initial colostomy followed by definitive repair later is recommended. We report a newborn infant with anorectal atresia investigated at six hours of age using MRI to locate the level of atresia. Conventional x-ray utilises bowel gas as contrast to outline the terminal section of the gut. Hence, x-ray is often not performed until 18 hours when adequate gas, to provide contrast, is present in the distal bowel. MR imaging utilises the high signal of meconium on T1 weight scans to delineate the terminal section of the bowel thus removing the need to wait for a delayed plain radiograph. This enables a decision to be made regarding the surgical procedure before the distal bowel is gas filled, hence, the bowel is in better condition for surgery. A further advantage is that it may confirm the presence of associated anomalies including accompanying fistulae and spinal or renal tract malformations.






[PDF Not available]*


        
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1116    
    Printed64    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded0    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 


Contact us | Sitemap | Advertise | What's New | Copyright and Disclaimer 

  2005 - Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow 

Online since 1st May '05